Articles
JEFF SOTO and SASHIE MASAKATSU

 

Jeff Soto, “L.A.: Decay and Overgrowth”

 

 

June 25 - July 27, 2015 at KP Projects // MKG, Miracle Mile

by Molly Enholm

 

Although quite distinct, two concurrent solo exhibitions share a common penchant for the extraordinary. Riverside-based artist Jeff Soto and Japan-based Sashie Masakatsu combine real-world imagery with surreal distortions and fantastical settings to create fictional worlds that ultimately seem to comment upon similar concerns that haunt contemporary life.

 

Read more...
 
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, JULY/AUGUST 2015

 

Andrea Zittel, “Aggregated Stacks and the Collection of Palm Springs Art Museum,” 2015, installation, is currently on view at Palm Springs Museum.

 

If you haven’t had a chance to see the Museum’s new Architecture and Design Center, Andrea Zittel's "Aggregated Stacks and the Collection of the Palm Springs Art Museum" provides an excellent reason to go. The  "Aggregated Stacks" are simple, stacked cubicles which sit on the floor or hang on the walls, filling the majority of the main gallery. They are made from the many cardboard shipping boxes that arrived at Zittel’s Joshua Tree  studio. Being an eco-minded artist, she came up with a way to re-use them.

 

Read more...
 
JUNE, 2015

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for June, 2015.

 
NOAH PURIFOY

 

Noah Purifoy, “From the Point of View of the Little People,” 1994, mixed media construction, 120 x 96 x 18”. © Noah Purifoy Foundation; photo: Fredrick Nilsen.

 

 

June 7, 2015 - February 28, 2016 at Los Angeles County Museum of Art [LACMA], Miracle Mile

by A. Moret

 

While California assemblage artist Noah Purifoy (1917-2004) remains on the fringes of familiarity to many, his civic leadership shaped the landscape of Los Angeles and forever transformed the Mojave Desert. Inspired by found objects, Purifoy created works fueled by a desire to inspire change, both aesthetic and political. His artistic practice demonstrated an unwavering commitment to engage in a social dialogue regarding civil liberties and equality. “Noah Purifoy: Junk Dada” focuses on the distinctive styles the artist employed from his early work dating from 1965 that used remnants from the Watts Riots, through his later large-scale installations he created on his ten-acre property in Joshua Tree.

Read more...
 
SHERRY KARVER

 

Sherry Karver, “Imagination”

 

 

May 20 - July 10, 2015 at Sue Greenwood Fine Art, Orange County

by Daniella Walsh

 

Anyone aware of his or her surroundings knows that any place in the world offers a potential people watcher’s paradise. That holds especially true for Sherry Karver, who specializes in text-enhanced, multi-media works. Paint enhances photographic images of crowd scenes mounted on wood panels. Karver then introduces stories about the people and things she has observed and recorded, inserting the text inside the outlined contours of selected figures.

 

Read more...
 
NANCY MONK

 

Nancy Monk, “nordic flower,” 2015, ink on linen, 12 x 9”.

 

 

May 30 - July 4, 2015 at Craig Krull Gallery, Santa Monica

by Jody Zellen

 

 

Nancy Monk's current paintings, presented under the title “Maybe," can't help but bring to mind the work of Paul Klee, Joan Miro and Alexander Calder, whose delightful pieces are full of lyrical whimsy. Although Monk's palette is purposely limited (she shies away from the bright colors of these antecedents in favor of a more muted palette drawn from the natural landscape) her juxtaposition of lines, shapes and images allude to the wonders of nature. Monk speaks about the intuitive aspects of her process, that one thing often leads to another within a single work and across a series. She is interested in the relationships between shapes and surfaces, together with the surprises that occur when mediums are combined — for example ink and gesso.

 

Read more...
 
HUGO CROSTHWAITE

 

Hugo Crosthwaite, “Tijuana Radiant Shine No. 14”

 

 

May 16 - June 20, 2015 at Luis De Jesus, Culver City

by Mario Cutajar

 

Hugo Crosthwaite’s latter-day baroque realism is important for reasons that extend beyond the opportunities it affords the artist to display his considerable skills as a draughtsman. They are reasons that have to do with the vicissitudes of representation in an age assumed to have a surfeit of it.

 

Read more...
 
KORDA

 

Alberto Diaz Gutiérrez (Korda), “Guerrillero Heroico”

 

 

May 15 - August 2, 2015 at Museum of Latin American Art [MOLAA], Long Beach

by Shirle Gottlieb

 

 

We've seen pictures of its vintage automobiles; and newsreels are fascinating by virtue of the facades of its aging Art Nouveau buildings. We admire the success of its children's music program, while articles appear about the quality of health care received by its people. But what about Cuba's visual arts during the most repressive and isolated years following Castro’s Revolution? Now that the United States has resumed negotiations with this small island off the coast of Florida, everyone is wondering what kind of work was being produced and what picture of Cuba it reflected. With the opening of "Korda: Photography and the Cuban Revolution," a series of vintage, black and white photographs from the Pieczenik private collection, we get an intimate look at Cuban society from the late 50s and early 60s.

 

Read more...
 
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, JUNE 2015

 

Chris Burden working on “Metropolis II,” 2010.

 

When Chris Burden succumbed to cancer last month at age 69 I had to think again about the premature departure of Mike Kelley three years ago.  Not because there is any similarity in the circumstance or spirit of the loss, but that arguably the two most key creative figures in visual art of their generation have died early, if at least well into their very productive maturity. There is an element of irony that Burden’s early performance career was specifically defined by his deliberate if carefully controlled exposure to fatality (by gunfire, electrocution, drowning or, for heaven’s sake, crucifixion). Burden was willing, in those days, to incur physical wounds so as to imply that he was willing to risk his life to make an aesthetic point. But as time went on it became clear he was too smart and probably well adjusted to undergo the death by excess that rock ’n’ roll contemporaries such as Morrison, Joplin and Hendrix permitted themselves to indulge in. No, these antics were not a thinly veiled death wish so much as a dare — which almost none among his peers were willing to ante up on. For sure I wasn’t.

 

Read more...
 
MAY, 2015

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for May, 2015.

 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 Next > End >>

Page 10 of 13
Articles Archive | Older Articles prior to March 2010