Articles
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, NOVEMBER/DECEMBER 2015

 

Mark Dion, “Cabinet of Marine Debris,” mixed media, is currently on view at USC.  Courtesy of Tanya Bonakdar Gallery

 

 

The timely and disturbing “Gyre:  The Plastic Ocean” has traveled from the Anchorage Museum with an art warning about something called a “gyre.” Although the mind immediately leaps to “Turning and turning in the widening gyre,” the message in this case is not from Yeats but from the sea. The Pacific Ocean churns between the Asian coast and the American coast in what is termed the North Pacific Gyre and here, in the heart of the ocean, the Great Garbage Patch is swirling endlessly. For years, artists have been attracted to this growing ecological disaster of waste and abandonment, an unintended consequence of a consumer culture. Presenting an assemblage of shopping bags, Dianna Cohen sums up the source of the garbage problem—I shop, I throw away.

 

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OCTOBER, 2015

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for October, 2015.

 
ISHIUCHI MIYAKO

 

Ishiuchi Miyako, "ひろ / hiroshima #9”

 

 

October 6, 2015 - February 21, 2015 at the J. Paul Getty Museum, West Los Angeles

by Jody Zellen

 

Ishiuchi Miyako is a highly regarded Japanese photographer, if not well known in the United States. She is a contemporary of both Nobuyoshi Araki and Daido Moriyama, postwar photographers who came to prominence in the 1960s and 1970s. "Postwar Shadows" is the first comprehensive exhibition devoted to her work here. The exhibition traces a nuanced career that forms three phases, spanning from 1976 to 2011.

 

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RON RIZK

 

Ron Rizk, “Code of the West 3"

 

 

October 24 - December 5, 2015 at Lora Schlesinger Gallery, Bergamont Station, Santa Monica

by Shirle Gottlieb

 

 

Ron Rizk had been creating his own unique approach to painting that brings together the shallow space tromp l’oeil of John Peto and William Harnett with California assemblage since the late 1960s. By combining old, antique relics, out-moded inventions and long-forgotten toys with torn pieces of paper objects and photographs, he's able to make clever political and social criticism about contemporary affairs, national events and world happenings.

 

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JON FURLONG

 

Jon Furlong, “Martha Cooper Paste Up, NYC”

 

 

October 10 - October 24, 2015 at Subliminal Projects, Echo Park

by A. Moret

 

Reflected from a fractured mirror found on a side street of London, photographer Jon Furlong reveals himself. His visage remains obscured by the body of his camera, but his reflection collides with the reflection of a red sightseeing bus, signage and the silhouettes of bystanders who happen to share the frame with the photographer. While the work is titled “Self Portrait,” very little of Furlong’s identity is revealed as he documents the world that exists behind-the-scenes of Shepard Fairey's OBEY GIANT.

 

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CECILIA MIGUEZ

 

Cecilia Z. Miguez, “The Bee Man”

 

 

September 24 - November 7, 2015 at Louis Stern Fine Arts, West Hollywood

by Simone Kussatz

 

Finally the cultural treasures of Latin America and its artists are being recognized through major events such as Pacific Standard Time: L.A. /L.A. (Los Angeles/Latin America) scheduled to open in two years from now, but also through its increasing display of Latin American art in galleries nationally, the building of a new Latin American Museum in Miami, and art fairs such as Pinta.

 

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MARK WHALEN

 

Mark Whalen, “Edits”

 

 

September 12 - October 3, 2015 at KP Projects, Miracle Mile

by G. James Daichent

 

Stylized black and white figures meander and live within pink, teal and purple geometric landscapes that are reminiscent of virtual reality due to a limited palette and calculated placement. Whether it’s paint, ink, or ceramic, the aesthetic of Mark Whalen is consistent and refined. Details should not come as a surprise, since the artist carefully constructs these visual experiments like a mathematician. The end result witnesses figures enacting in a variety of painful and/or gleeful actions. Recognizable human acts are given just enough distance from real life so as to keep us at an observer’s remove.

 

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CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, OCTOBER 2015

 

Michael Waugh, “Les régles de l’art,” 2015, ink on mylar, 4 panels, each 102 x 42", is currently on view at Von Lintel.

 

 

Michael Waugh's obsessively intricate drawings on mylar have a noble and ever-poignant central core  — the troubling intersections of politics, wealth and power. Using micrography, transforming written text into representational imagery, he presents scenes both urban and semi-rural, as well as detailed portraits of horses, in a graphic aesthetic consistent with their late 19th/early 20th-century settings. Using texts from capitalist theory among other similar sources, Waugh's newsprint-like imagery is so finely rendered that it only breaks down into text under careful inspection. These are not mere formal exercises.  The horses and human figures alike are depicted with an innocent charm that belie the ominous forebodings made apparent in titles such as "Crisis on the Horizon," or the spot-on word-to-text interplay of "Before Our Very Eyes." "Les règles de l’art," at 102 x 168 inches on four panels, is by far the largest piece, and also the most spectacular: a city street of perhaps a century ago stretches from a corner off towards a distant bend. The fourth building down from the corner is in mid-implosion, as if detonated from within, but only the horse-and-carriage faltering just beneath its collapse appears to register the dire circumstance; others just mill about. The work is too stylized to suit the literal content of Pierre Bourdieu’s book Les règles de l’art, (“The Rules of Art”) which explores the connection between art and the social structures within society by which art is produced and received. But Waugh's message and method execute a perfect tip-toe of a sneak attack.

 

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SEPTEMBER, 2015

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for September, 2015.

 
FRANK GEHRY

 

Frank Gehry, "Fondation Louis Vuitton Final Design Model,' 2005–14, Paris, France, Gehry Partners, LLP, Los Angeles. © 2015 Gehry Partners, LLP.

 

 

September 13, 2015 - January 31, 2016, at Los Angeles County Museum of Art [LACMA], Miracle Mile

by Diane Calder

 

 

When Frank Gehry utilized rough plywood panels, chain link fencing and corrugated steel to construct an augmentation to the Dutch colonial style residence he purchased in the 1970’s, the rugged entrapment of the original structure was not unequivocally appreciated by his Santa Monica neighbors. But as the architect’s deconstructed home gained recognition as a groundbreaking project, Gehry’s wrapped subversion of the residence served to promote his innovative approach to common utilitarian materials. This gave the Canadian born, Los Angeles based architect an edge in procuring the commission for MOCA’s early 1980’s repurposing of a former warehouse near little Tokyo into the initially interim exhibition space that took on the nickname of “The Temporary Contemporary.” The 55,000 square-foot facility captivated artists and visitors with its accessibility. It’s informality and lack of pretension offered enormous latitude for the exhibition of innovative works such as Chris Burden’s institutional critique and literal dig, “Exposing the Foundations of Art.”

 

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