Articles
STARTING NOVEMBER 2016

 

Effective November 2016 all ArtScene editorial content is published at Visual Art Source ONLY. The ArtScene website remains online only for archival purposes.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 
OCTOBER 2016

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for October, 2016.

 
PABLO PICASSO



Pablo Picasso, “Long-Haired Young Girl,” 1945, lithograph, 3rd state, 15 x 12 1/2”.


October 14, 2016 - February 13, 2017 at Norton Simon Museum, Pasadena

by Scarlet Cheng



Pablo Picasso had a restless creativity. Throughout his life, he also had plenty of energy to explore new mediums and see what they could do for him. “States of Mind: Picasso Lithographs 1945–1960” culls some 80 examples from its own remarkable collection of some 700 Picasso prints. These were made during a period when the artist was particularly keen on the experimentation possible in the medium, and also on making a record of his own process. This can be done quite easily with lithography, since it is a “flat” process — the image does not eat into the plate, like an etching. Using a special type of crayon or ink, the image is drawn or transferred onto the litho stone or plate, and this image can be redrawn and scraped to make successive prints.

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GEORGE HERMS



George Herms, “Wildcard"


October 1 - 29, 2016 at OCCCA, Orange County#mce_temp_url#

by Mario Cutajar



An exhibition of recent work by seminal assemblagist George Herms is, among other things, an opportunity to reflect on what ties assemblage to modernity and what relevance it might retain for a contemporary audience. Herms’ practice suggests that it has something to do with affirming memory and connection in a world that grows ever more atomized and amnesiac despite (or perhaps, because of) its technological interconnectedness.

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LUCINDA LUVAAS and RUFUS SNODDY

 

 

Rufus Snoddy, “Behind My Back,” 2016, mixed media.


October 1 - November 20, 2016 at MuzeuMM, South Los Angeles#mce_temp_url#

by Elenore Welles



Though the conceptual techniques of Lucinda Luvaas and Rufus Snoddy differ, each has overtones of social consciousness and each provide insights into their individual ideologies and histories. Though varying in background and experience, both artists tackle visceral relations to their environment.

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RICHARD BAKER



Richard Baker, “On Closer Examination"


October 22 - November 26, 2016 at Skidmore Contemporary Art, Santa Monica#mce_temp_url#

by Jeanne Willette



What would Claude Monet paint if he were alive today? Where would Gustave Caillebotte set up his easel if he lived in Los Angeles? How would they paint, these masters of light and color, in the wake of digital images and mass media? The new suite of paintings by Richard Baker recalibrate many of the themes of the Impressionists — scenes of leisure and pleasure, but in this case the California version of life in the suburbs of Paris in the 1870s.

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"100 YEARS OF NATIONAL PARKS"



Art Wolfe, “Thunderstorm”


October 4 - December 24, 2016 at G2 Gallery, Venice#mce_temp_url#

by Simone Kussatz


Every year millions of people from all over the world visit America’s national parks to view grand landscapes and unspoiled nature. Resources provided by the National Park Service inform the curious about America’s history, values and culture. The diversity of the flora and fauna, the peaceful and breathtaking views and solitude one finds in them offer an escape from the normal cacophony and distractions of modern life. One’s mind gets replenished; one’s spirit rejuvenated. President Theodore Roosevelt promoted nature’s positive effect on the human soul years after he temporarily left New York and politics in 1884 to join cattle raisers in North Dakota as a way to deal with the deaths of his wife and mother.

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CONTINUING AND RECOMMENDED, OCTOBER 2016

 

Amy Bennett, “Sleepy Town,” 2016, oil on canvas, 20 x 28”, is currently on view at Richard Heller.

"Small Changes Every Day" is at once the title and the methodology of Amy Bennett's new paintings. She renders an invented landscape and the ensuing town that develops, drawing us in a holding our focus as we examine minute details and variations in painting style within a given work. The paintings depict the same town viewed from varying perspectives and are, in fact, of an expansive 3D model of this invented locale. Bennett began with the landscape, carving mountains and hills, then populating the scene with wire and foam trees. The empty landscape is depicted in numerous paintings, and can be seen in the background of the paintings of the town. She fabricated over 450 buildings at a 1/500 scale, filling an eight-foot square platform. Her progress is effectively documented through the paintings. While the model from which the paintings were inspired is not exhibited, seeing its photograph in the catalog puts the whole project into perspective and makes it even more impressive (Richard Heller Gallery, Santa Monica).#mce_temp_url#

Jody Zellen

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SEPTEMBER 2016

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for September, 2016.

 
KARLA KLARIN



Karla Klarin, “Drive Thru,” 1996, oil on 3D, four panels, 84 x 96”.

 

August 29 - Octoer 8, 2016 at CSU Northridge Art Gallery, San Fernando Valley#mce_temp_url#

by G. James Daichendt



Frank Lloyd Wright is credited with saying: “Tip the world over on its side and everything loose will land in Los Angeles.” Wright was addressing the city’s strongest characteristic, its ability to absorb all trends, styles, traditions, and influences. The growth of L.A. from a Mexican pueblo to a major metropolitan center defies a simple description. Yet L.A. is now the most diverse city in the nation, an astonishing feat for a city that is often reduced to a stereotypical image of the Hollywood sign. Karla Klarin grew up in the San Fernando Valley and decided to remain in Los Angeles after short stints in San Francisco and Italy. The absence of a center and the many banal aspects of L.A. not only inspired her, but she thrived off this and found it to be encouraging as a young artist. This is an enthusiasm that has carried her for close to four decades, and is now the subject of a career survey.

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