Articles
DECEMBER, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for December, 2014.

 
ELIZABETH TURK and LITA ALBUQUERQUE

 

Elizabeth Turk, “Collar #11”

 

 

October 25, 2014 - January 25, 2015 at Laguna Art Museum, Orange County

by Daniella Walsh

 

 

The object in its white purity looks as if it has been swept up by the ocean and deposited in the shallow surf, suggesting a mysterious sea creature that is impervious to its environment. On close inspection it has been placed there not by nature but by a human hand, an intricate form resembling a sort of lace collar carved from marble.

 

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EMERSON WOELFFER

 

Emerson Woelffer, “Untitled”

 

 

October 29 - December 20, 2014 at Manny Silverman Gallery, West Hollywood

by Elenore Welles

 

 

After almost three-quarters of a century of looking at Abstract Expressionist art, reinvented many times over, it is difficult to approach Emerson Woelffer’s impressive oeuvre with fresh eyes. However, it behooves us to remember that he is recognized as a West Coast pioneer of the form, and that his distinctive works are the result of myriad influences and personal sensibilities. Equally skilled in an impressive variety of styles, Woelffer’s paintings, drawings, collages and lithographs incorporate a range of materials.  Included are chalk, charcoal, oil and acrylic paints, roof cement and tarpaper. The vitality of these surface qualities led to a highly personalized brand of Abstract Expressionism.

 

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JEANNE SILVERTHORNE

 

Jeanne Silverthorne, “Insomnia”

 

 

November 1, 2014 - January 3, 2015 at Shoshana Wayne Gallery, Santa Monica

by Suvan Geer

 

 

Jeanne Silverthorne casts her sculptures in synthetic rubber and with that surprising physicality she earnestly but also playfully autopsies the life out of the contemporary world. "Down the Hole and Into the Grain" is the artist’s continuation of an ongoing examination of nature morte, (dead nature) that plays on the tradition of still life. The translucent softness of the rubber, which Silverthorne has referred to as a kind of “flesh”, makes familiar objects selected from things in her studio and daily life decidedly strange and provocative. Pseudo rolls of wood grained flooring, huge lumber packing crates, blooming flowers, dentures and rolling wood dollies all drop their physical ties to the natural world and become oddly artificial in ways both layered and disturbing.

 

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NICHOLAS GRENIER and LILY STOCKMAN

 

Lily Stockman, “DTLA,” 2014, oil on Indian linen, 60 x 48”.

 

 

November 8 - December 20, 2014 at Luis De Jesus Gallery, Culver City

by Jody Zellen

 

 

In many ways Nicolas Grenier and Lily Stockman's paintings are perfect complements. They share formal qualities as well as political ideologies, yet the two artists present their concerns in quite different ways.

 

Grenier's paintings reference visual maps of information that merge abstraction with polemics. They take their cues from data visualizations where gradients are often used to depict transitions from one state to another, often with arrows that flow in multiple directions indicating the different ways that information can move. Under the title "One Day Mismatched Anthems Will Be Shouted in Tune" Grenier creates a suite of paintings in which colors are mixed to form earth-toned gradients sharing space with cryptic texts and looping arrows. Concentric rectangles and broad stripes of color gradations divide the paintings into sections. These sections become "rings of pleasant colors," as one painting proclaims.

 

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SCOTT SHORT

 

Scott Short, “Untitled (green)”

 

 

November 8, 2014 - January 3, 2015 at Christopher Grimes Gallery, Santa Monica

by Michael Shaw

 

 

Scott Short makes copies. And he continues to make them — over and over and over again. In "More and the Same," "the Same" is five new paintings from his career-making oeuvre — images concocted from a heavy sequence of copies — and "More" comes in the form of a relatively surprising departure, "Thank you, Adam West, For Helping To Make Me The Man I Am Today," a series of 48 portraits of revered writers, musicians and thinkers, each camouflaged in Batman headgear.

 

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NOVEMBER 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for November, 2014.

 
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, DECEMBER 2014

 

Lita Albuquerque, “Stellar Axis Achernar,” 2014, pigment print, 60 x 60”, is currently on view at Kohn.

 

 

The centerpiece of Lita Albuquerque’s exhibition “Light Carries Information” is an eight-minute film, "Stellar Axis: Antarctica." Shot on location on Earth’s southernmost continent in 2006 by a team accompanying the artist, it portrays her groundbreaking installation and performance there, “Stellar Axis.” With Antarctica’s backdrop of endless snow, often in 40 degree below zero weather, Albuquerque and her team based the installation on a star map of 99 of the brightest stars visible at the South Pole. Over a two-week period, the team placed 99 ultramarine blue fiberglass spheres, from 10 inches to four feet in diameter, on the snow, arranged to match the star map. The short film pans over this extraordinary Land Art exhibition, the end result of the artist’s decades of envisioning an exhibition that would marry the earth with the heavens, and finally receiving a grant to create it, then methodically carrying the project out.

 

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ALISON SAAR

 

Alison Saar, “Foison,” 2011, carved wood clad in green patina copper sheets with cast bronze cotton balls and moths and acrylic paint. Courtesy of the Artist and L.A. Louver, Venice CA.

 

 

Through January 11, 2015 at Watts Towers Art Center, South Los Angeles

by Marlena Donohue



Hot house — the words invoke orchids, a Tennessee Williams play where America’s oxygen is torpid, macho, oddly erotic, or those long, crowded cabins where slaves slept, sang, birthed, bled. "Hot House" is the title of Alison Saar’s show and the content — formal as well as associative — is as varied and complex as those words. The examples gathered here will be familiar to anyone who follows Saar’s work: nappy hairdos and fecund breasts sprouting milk (or roots) from erect nipples — as in the wall bound "Lunarseas: Sea of Nectar." All of the works are made with Saar’s singular gift for elegant, arduous technique (bronze that looks like wood; wood that is patina-ed) that’s unquestionably the product of academic study, but hinged to this feeling that they’ve been sketched or carved on a back porch or modeled of clay from a river bed. I’d venture that Saar wouldn’t find this last observation colonially insensitive. Striking these chords seems intentional, strategic, profoundly felt and studied on her part.

 

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GIL KOFMAN


Gil Kofman, “Untitled”


November 8, 2014 - January 10, 2015 at dnj Gallery, Santa Monica

by Andy Brumer

 

 

If all the world’s a stage, then the multi-talented photographer Gil Kofman has selected its most fluid, romantic, and mystical “floor boards” on which to set this performance-like exhibition. Indeed, Kofman’s photographs of surfers, performing on the waves in varying positions, states or stages of surfing, have the metaphorical look and feel both of actors in an ensemble hitting their choreographed marks and of ordinary human beings engaged in life’s flow. The late great scholar and mythologist Joseph Campbell often said that he felt most alive and at one with the world while running races for his Columbia University’s track team.

 

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