Articles
SEPTEMBER, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for September, 2014.

 
ROBERTO FABELO

 

Roberto Fabelo, “Anatomia de un pensamiento / Anatomy of a Thought”

 

 

 

June 28 - September 28, 2014 at Museum of Latin American Art, Long Beach

September 13 - October 18, 2014 at Couturier Gallery, Los Angeles

by Shirle Gottlieb/Bill Lasarow

 

 

Though he's internationally known in a career spanning five decades, most of us have never heard of Roberto Fabelo for a good reason. His exhibit continuing at the Museum of Latin American Art is his first solo museum show in the United States, and the show of new work at Couturier his first gallery exhibition here. I guarantee this, however; if you take a trip to Long Beach to see "Fabelo's Anatomy” or to see the recent work in Los Angeles you will never, ever forget this artist. Not only does his playful imagery evoke Gabriel Garcia Marquez's magical realism and the surreal world of Hieronymus Bosch — executed with the craftsmanship of Dutch/Flemish masters — it is also humorous in its comedic treatment of human desire. In fact, the term "Kafka-esque" might spring to mind; and that's no joke.

 

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LUCY + JORGE ORTA

 

Lucy + Jorge Orta, “OrtaWater—Mobile Intervention Unit,” 2005, Mexican transport tricycle, steel structure, 4 bivouacs, 2 Mexican water carafes, 6 OrtaWater bottles, 2 jerry cans, plastic tubes, 2 taps.

 

 

August 16 - December 6, 2014 at Otis College, Ben Maltz Gallery, West Side

by Michael Shaw

 

 

Lucy and Jorge Orta are nothing if not optimistic. The work and life partners — she from the UK, he from Argentina — converged to form their collaboration over twenty years ago; and their projects encompass design, architecture, couture and a Paris-adjacent non-profit research organization that encourages the site-specific experimental work of others. Their work, often performative and participatory, offers its viewers-cum-participants the opportunity to engage socially while simultaneously encouraging us to confront our (that is, the world's) various food and environmental crises.  This is not only a worthy but noble gesture, not to mention a tough sell. Diners at a Studio Orta event might, for instance, eat from a Royal Limoges porcelain plate (from an edition of up to 1500) atop a silkscreen-printed runner or an inkjet picnic cloth. Lucy Orta started working with recycled food way back in the mid-90s, when she took produce discards from Parisian farmer's markets and converted them to pickles, jams and purees, tapping into the zeitgeist of the Freegan movement, then just in its infancy.

 

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MAY SUN

 

May Sun, "Symphony of Bird Cries:  Prelude to a Good Bye”

 

 

 

September 2 - October 9, 2014 at College of the Canyons Art Gallery, Valley

by Diane Calder

 

 

The mix of agendas and expectations held by engineers, designers, elected officials, and community stakeholders invested in planning public spaces can make the ability to capture the spirit and atmosphere of the cultural milieu in public works of art a challenge. May Sun, a known problem solver, successfully works around factitious restrictions that foster sameness and blandness.

 

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MINORU OHIRA

Minoru Ohira, from the “Landscape” series

 

 

September 14 - October 12, 2014 at Offramp Gallery, Pasadena

by Scarlet Cheng

 

 

It is a rare pleasure to see this solo show by Minoru Ohira, a San Gabriel Valley artist who crafts sculpture of quiet power using found objects and salvaged construction materials. He shows frequently in Japan, but not so frequently in the Los Angeles area. This Pasadena show features about a dozen works — five from his new “Landscape” series, which are multi-paneled, horizontal wall pieces, plus half a dozen floor sculptures and the large and rather epic “Santa Ana Wind.”

 

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JAMES ENSOR

 

James Ensor, “The Oyster Eater”

 

 

Through September 7 at The Getty Museum, West Los Angeles

by Betty Ann Brown

 

 

James Ensor (1860-1949) had two brilliant careers, first as an avant-garde Realist and then as a forerunner of modern Expressionism. During both phases, he created radiantly beautiful and deeply haunting images.

 

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CONTINUING AND RECOMMENDED, SEPTEMBER 2014

 

Marcia Hafif,  (left) “From the Inventory:  Shade Paintings:  Group 6:  Scarlet Lake, Schevenengen Orange, Cadmium Yellow, Emerald Green, Ultramarine Blue, Dioxizine Purple,” oil on canvas, 18 x 18" each. (right) "From the Inventory: Shade Paintings: Group 5: Neutral Mix, Indian Yellow-Green, Permanent Magenta, Davy’s Grey,” oil on canvas, 22 x 22" each. Courtesy the artist. Photo by Brian Forrest.

 

 

"Made in L.A." is the Hammer Museum's biennial nod to what is hot, new, trendy and not to be missed in Los Angeles. Curated by Michael Ned Holte and the Hammer’s Connie Butler, the exhibition is not medium nor age specific though there are more younger than older artists included. Each of the 35 artists is given ample space, so this is not a sampler show by numerous artists. Viewers can get a sense of what most of the artists are about. Media range freely from sculptures to video installations and from projections to paintings. There, by intent, is no overall theme or subject that binds these artists together, other than they are dedicated to their ouevres and have created a body of work that is of the moment.

 

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JULY/AUGUST, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for July/August, 2014.

 
"LARGE AS LIFE"

 

Elaine Katzer, "Cougar Totem”

 

 

June 14 - August 31, 2014 at American Museum of Ceramic Art [AMoCA], Pomona

by Suvan Geer

 

 

Mud. It’s the time-digested and sopping residue of mountains, trees, bodies, roads and cities all ground into dust. Artists working in clay touch that transformed history. Some even sculpt and shape it in ways that encourage us to remember parts of it.  The three sculptors in “Large as Life” make figures out of clay that have a kind of abiding reverence for organic nature not only of the muddy material but also for the lives and history composted within it.

 

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DAVID HOCKNEY

 

David Hockney, “The Arrival of Spring in Woldgate, East Yorkshire in 2011 (twenty eleven) — 2 January”

 

 

July 10 - August 29, 2014 at L.A. Louver Gallery, Venice

by Mario Cutajar

 

 

I’m inclined to regard the Yorkshire landscapes that David Hockney has been turning out for the last nine or so years as possibly the finest body of work he has done, a distillation of lessons learned over a lifetime of observation and experimentation propelled by an ambition to make the fullest possible use of the European art canon.

 

That ambition, it should be noted, has its pitfalls. Hockney’s talent, for better or worse, has always been that of an extraordinarily adept pasticheur. You can see this from the very beginning of his career when he’s absorbing and cute-ifying Dubuffet and Bacon and Ab Ex. Later on he adds Matisse, Bonnard, and Pop’s flatness and graphic incisiveness to the mix. The combination serves him brilliantly in fabulating a vision of Los Angeles as an all-white lotusland bedecked with blue swimming pools and young male bubble butts. (According to the Tate website, “In California, Hockney discovered, everybody had a swimming pool.” Everybody.) Later still, he latched on to cubism and mined it for decorative motifs and compositional ideas. In all this, as Mark Hudson astutely noted in a Telegraph review, “Hockney’s strength was his lightness of touch in appropriating and juxtaposing diverse graphic forms.” He was, according to Hudson, “post-modern before the fact,” which is perhaps an indirect way of stating that as an inveterate painterly magpie he anticipated what in the ‘80s would become standard artistic operating procedure.

 

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