Articles
JANUARY, 2015

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for January, 2015.

 
CHUCK CLOSE

 

Chuck Close, “Phil II,” 1982, handmade paper pulp, 69 x 53 1/2”.  Collection of the Jordan Schnitzer Family Foundation, © Chuck Close, courtesy Pace Prints.

 

 

January 17 - April 5, 2015 at Pepperdine University, Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art, Malibu

by Jeanne Willette

 

 

Now that we have left behind that era of art called “contemporary,” or the art of the post-war period, it is about time to contemplate the twilight of the aging contemporary art stars and take note of how their work has matured. Chuck Close has built an extensive and deep oeuvre built on a small idea writ large: the modern face. I use the word “face” so as to stress that the word “portrait” is not the precise term for what it is that Close actually does. A lazy analysis would slouch towards the portrait, which, properly understood, is a holistic idea of an individual that both idealizes and symbolizes a persona. Close always eschewed the inherent idealism and spirituality of the traditional notion of portraiture and teased out the fact that a face is not a portrait: a face is a physical fact. It can be argued that only through printmaking was Close able to fully realize the concept of the face — the materiality of an object defamiliarized through scale and literally remade by the actual hands-on processes that echo the additive process of molding.

 

Read more...
 
JOHN VALADEZ

 

John Valadez, “Lover’s Creek”

 

 

January 10 - February 21 at Robert Berman Gallery, Santa Monica

by Scarlet Cheng

 

 

John Valadez is one of Southern California’s most gifted portrait artists. He has a deft hand and insightful powers of observation, and manages to capture the lively form along with the lively spirit of his subjects, whether working on small drawings and pastels or large paintings and murals. He also has a knack for distilling quintessential moments in the lives of ordinary people, people in the Chicano community of East L.A.  Born in Los Angeles, Valadez grew up in Boyle Heights and attended East Los Angeles Junior College before going on to get a BFA at Cal State Long Beach.

 

Read more...
 
BETTY GOLD

 

Betty Gold, "Majestad V"

 

 

January 10 - February 28, 2015 at FP Contemporary, Culver City

by Kathy Zimmerer

 

 

Betty Gold's incisive geometric sculptures in glowing primary colors are always deceptively simple yet rooted in complexity. She folds over her forms and they interact with space in intriguing ways. Best known for her sculpture, she also has always painted and her jewel-like stylized acrylics are also included in the exhibit. The sculptures and paintings here work well together, each one playing off the other in terms of spatial relationships and brilliant color. For example, the sculpture “Tiron" occupies different spatial layers as the three folded forms, respectively yellow, blue and red, are interconnected in space yet stay apart. This is similar to what happens on the surface of her painting "Felix II," where the same bold colors are used. Gold uses black lines to delineate the geometry of the painting, whereas in the sculpture she uses the negative space between each piece to accentuate the staggered spatial relationship.

 

Read more...
 
“THE HEART IS THE FRAME”

 

Emily Roysdon, “Untitled (David Wojnarowicz project),” 2001-07, silver gelatin print, 11 x 14”.

 

 

January 7 - February 14, 2015 at LACE, Hollywood

by Diane Calder

 

 

The curator of “The Heart is the Frame," Shoghig Halajian, selected participants and laid out the exhibition's groundwork with assertions from philosopher Gilles Deleuze in mind. Nearly a century after Eadweard Muybridge propelled a miner’s pick rhythmically back and forth in one of his famed photographic studies of repetitive motion, Deleuze claimed that art is often the source of repetition. “It is not by chance that a poem must be learned by heart. The head is the organ of exchange, but the heart is the amorous organ of repetition.” Halajian quotes the statement above from Deleuze’s book “Difference and Repetition” as a link to understanding how repetition and routine inform our way of behaving. She emphasizes that the work by these seven diverse artists “explores how desire is integrated into the project of normalizing. By highlighting desire within daily life, it aims to empower and stimulate one's position in the realm of the everyday, and to rethink the everyday as a site of critical inquiry and political potential.”

 

Read more...
 
LOU BEACH and PATSSI VALDEZ

 

Lou Beach, “Good George from Clara (Beaumont),” 2014, collage on paper, 9 1/4 x 11 3/4”.

 

 

December 7 - January 4, 2015 at Offramp Gallery, Pasadena

by G. James Daichendt

 

 

Is it possible to reinvent yourself? Artists Lou Beach and Patssi Valdez experienced success in their respective subcultures before embarking on new creative journeys. Beach was primarily known as an illustrator and Valdez as a political artist/activist. While the two artists are represented in separate exhibits here, their combined shift in focus towards a more personal and playful direction has ushered them into a second life that provides a basis for this pairing.

 

Read more...
 
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, JANUARY 2015

 

Jennifer Steinkamp, “6EQUJ5,” 2012, 17 x 22 ft., dimensions variable, is currently on view at Art Center.  Photo:  Chuck Spangler.

 

 

“REALSPACE” combines works of art and works of science, blurring what might seem to be traditional boundaries between the two disciplines. Opening the catalog for the multifaceted exhibition, curator Stephen Nowlin traces the evolution of humanity’s obsession with mark making and the desire to capture the natural world pictorially, in part, as a means to understand the universe. From the very beginning to the latest ongoing experimentations, he argues, art has served as a means to illustrate or investigate scientific fact — or sometimes both.

 

Read more...
 
DECEMBER, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for December, 2014.

 
ELIZABETH TURK and LITA ALBUQUERQUE

 

Elizabeth Turk, “Collar #11”

 

 

October 25, 2014 - January 25, 2015 at Laguna Art Museum, Orange County

by Daniella Walsh

 

 

The object in its white purity looks as if it has been swept up by the ocean and deposited in the shallow surf, suggesting a mysterious sea creature that is impervious to its environment. On close inspection it has been placed there not by nature but by a human hand, an intricate form resembling a sort of lace collar carved from marble.

 

Read more...
 
EMERSON WOELFFER

 

Emerson Woelffer, “Untitled”

 

 

October 29 - December 20, 2014 at Manny Silverman Gallery, West Hollywood

by Elenore Welles

 

 

After almost three-quarters of a century of looking at Abstract Expressionist art, reinvented many times over, it is difficult to approach Emerson Woelffer’s impressive oeuvre with fresh eyes. However, it behooves us to remember that he is recognized as a West Coast pioneer of the form, and that his distinctive works are the result of myriad influences and personal sensibilities. Equally skilled in an impressive variety of styles, Woelffer’s paintings, drawings, collages and lithographs incorporate a range of materials.  Included are chalk, charcoal, oil and acrylic paints, roof cement and tarpaper. The vitality of these surface qualities led to a highly personalized brand of Abstract Expressionism.

 

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 3
Articles Archive | Older Articles prior to March 2010