Articles
NOVEMBER 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for November, 2014.

 
ALISON SAAR

 

Alison Saar, “Foison,” 2011, carved wood clad in green patina copper sheets with cast bronze cotton balls and moths and acrylic paint. Courtesy of the Artist and L.A. Louver, Venice CA.

 

 

Through January 11, 2015 at Watts Towers Art Center, South Los Angeles

by Marlena Donohue



Hot house — the words invoke orchids, a Tennessee Williams play where America’s oxygen is torpid, macho, oddly erotic, or those long, crowded cabins where slaves slept, sang, birthed, bled. "Hot House" is the title of Alison Saar’s show and the content — formal as well as associative — is as varied and complex as those words. The examples gathered here will be familiar to anyone who follows Saar’s work: nappy hairdos and fecund breasts sprouting milk (or roots) from erect nipples — as in the wall bound "Lunarseas: Sea of Nectar." All of the works are made with Saar’s singular gift for elegant, arduous technique (bronze that looks like wood; wood that is patina-ed) that’s unquestionably the product of academic study, but hinged to this feeling that they’ve been sketched or carved on a back porch or modeled of clay from a river bed. I’d venture that Saar wouldn’t find this last observation colonially insensitive. Striking these chords seems intentional, strategic, profoundly felt and studied on her part.

 

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GIL KOFMAN


Gil Kofman, “Untitled”


November 8, 2014 - January 10, 2015 at dnj Gallery, Santa Monica

by Andy Brumer

 

 

If all the world’s a stage, then the multi-talented photographer Gil Kofman has selected its most fluid, romantic, and mystical “floor boards” on which to set this performance-like exhibition. Indeed, Kofman’s photographs of surfers, performing on the waves in varying positions, states or stages of surfing, have the metaphorical look and feel both of actors in an ensemble hitting their choreographed marks and of ordinary human beings engaged in life’s flow. The late great scholar and mythologist Joseph Campbell often said that he felt most alive and at one with the world while running races for his Columbia University’s track team.

 

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AMBER JEAN YOUNG

 

Amber Jean Young, "The Drive In Floods Through Me"

 

 

October 18 - November 15, 2014 at Subliminal Projects, Echo Park

by Liz Goldner

 

 

Drawing on childhood memories, fantasies and imagination, Amber Jean Young creates quilted artworks as two-dimensional wall hangings and as three-dimensional sculptures. In “There’s Shape in These Hills I Know,” this daughter of singer/songwriter/musician Neil Young pays homage to an idyllic time when folklore provided the creative inspiration, and when needles, thread and fabric were used to manifest it. Having sketched and painted from early childhood, she studied art in college, eventually concentrating on painting large abstract canvasses. Since 2011, she has exhibited her work in several galleries in the Bay Area, where she lives.

 

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"WORLD WAR I: WAR OF IMAGES, IMAGES OF WAR” and “YOUR COUNTRY CALLS! POSTERS OF THE FIRST WORLD WAR"

 

Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, "Apokalypse II (St. John's vision of the seven candlesticks)”

 

 

November 18, 2014 - April 19, 2015 at Getty Research Center, West Los Angeles

by Mario Cutajar

 

 

On the centennial of the Great War, “World War I: War of Images, Images of War” presents images and artifacts that contrast the propaganda of the time with first-hand accounts and renderings that recount the reality of battlefield experiences. Drawn largely from the Center’s Special Collections but supplemented by loans, the exhibit is, perhaps, most notable for its inclusion of a good number of graphic and other works by artists who participated in or were close to the conflict. Contributions by George Grosz, Otto Dix, Ernst Ludwig Kirchner, Fernand Leger, Filippo Tommaso Marinetti, Natalia Goncharova, Kasimir Malevich, Max Beckmann and others are included. Also on view are photographs, trench art made by soldiers, illustrations from satirical journals and correspondence from the front. The never-before-displayed diary of Italian Futurist (and enthusiastic war supporter) Umberto Boccioni yields details of the Futurist artist’s introduction to combat in October 1915 as a volunteer in the short-lived Lombard Battalion of Volunteer Cyclists and Motorists, in which he served alongside Marinetti and other Futurists. Less than a year later, after being drafted into the regular army, Boccioni would die from a fall from a horse, the ultimate price for his zeal.

 

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ROLAND REISS

 

Roland Reiss, “Fleur du Mal,” 2008, acrylic on canvas, 68 x 52”.

 

 

November 8 - December 11, 2014 at CSU Fullerton, Begovich Gallery, Orange County

by Margarita Nieto/Bill Lasarow

 

In this retrospective Roland Reiss emerges as a key figure in the history of contemporary art in Southern California. While the works in this exhibition are readily identified with mainstream styles and concepts — starting with Abstract Expressionism, Conceptualism and other -isms — this is a narrative of an individual who freely explored the changing possibilities of making art without committing to any one. The question is whether we discern an aesthetic core or a rootless wanderer.

 

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CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, NOVEMBER 2014

 

Kristi Kent, “Tornado! The Musical (Performers View),” 2004, ultrachrome print mounted on honey combed cardboard, 24 x 32”, is currently on view at Edward Cella.

"6018 Wilshire" is a large group exhibition featuring numerous artists meant to commemorate the history of that space as a gallery. The gallery opened as Carl Berg Gallery in September 2003 with an exhibition by Kristi Kent. Its last exhibition as Carl Berg Gallery took place in April 2009. The gallery thereafter became Edward Cella Art + Architecture, keeping many of the artists who showed with Berg. Slated to move to a new space in 2015 (the property will be torn down to make way for a Metro Rail station), this is the last exhibition at 6018 Wilshire. The work is hung salon style, occupying all the walls of the gallery, yet is a surprisingly coherent selection of works by dozens of artists in which abstract as well as representational works in a variety of mediums are juxtaposed (Edward Cella Art + Architecture, Miracle Mile).

Jody Zellen

 

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OCTOBER, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for October, 2014.

 
ROBERTO CHAVEZ

 

Roberto Chavez, “The Path to Knowledge and the False University,” 1974 (whitewashed 1979), mural at East L.A. College.

 

 

September 23 - December 6, 2014 at Vincent Price Art Museum, East Los Angeles College, East Los Angeles

by Kathy Zimmerer

 

 

This long overdue retrospective of pioneering Chicano artist, Roberto Chavez, highlights his magnificent mural "The Path to Knowledge and the False University" (1974) (whitewashed by the East LA College President for political reasons in 1979), plus edgy, lush portraits, still lifes, political and genre scenes, which have been an inspiration to many Los Angeles Chicano artists. Concentrating on the work he created in the sixties and seventies through 1980, when he was a faculty member at East Los Angeles College, this exhibit is an eye opening look at an artist who easily incorporated ancient Mexican and colonial imagery, channeled European painting, especially cubism and the expressionist tendencies of Van Gogh, and then mixed in his unique California vision to create memorable and always dynamic paintings.

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BRUCE RICHARDS

Bruce Richards, "Darwinian Theory"

 

 

September 20 - November 29, 20145 at Jack Rutberg Fine Arts, Miracle Mile

by Daniella Walsh

 

 

The invitation to Bruce Richards, "Future/Past" consists of a cut-out of Richards’ diptych paintings “Before" and "After.” Placed in shaped frames, the stylized rendition of a woman’s lower torso was inspired by a performance by Marina Abramović during which she cut a pentagram into her belly with a razor blade. Perhaps off-putting to some at first glance, it is an apt introduction to an artist whose paintings and sculptures are informed by well-known and obscure facets of art history. Richards also delves into politics, dives into the mire of personal relationships and eviscerates a few sacred cows, all deployed with intelligence, wit and humor.

 

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