Articles
APRIL 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for April, 2014.

 
“HEARSAY: ARTISTS REVEAL URBAN LEGENDS”

 

Chris Farling, “Sewer Gator”

 

 

March 29 - May 8, 2014 at CSU Fullerton, Begovich Gallery, Orange County

by Michael Shaw

 

 

Bloody Mary in the mirror. The Vanishing Hitchhiker. The Bloody Hook. Bigfoot/Sasquatch. And a personal favorite: Pop Rocks and Coke, or more specifically, that eating Pop Rocks while drinking Coke will make your stomach explode, a myth most infamously attributed to the actor who played Mikey in the Life cereal commercials. These are among the urban legend classics. We all have at least a couple that we grew up with. But what were once folkloric, possibly mesmerizing myths have generally given way to pedestrian hoaxes. Snopes.com, a great online resource essentially devoted to debunking prevailing myths, may have been built on them. Prior to the rise of the internet’s dominance, with its blanketing of our lenses on the social sphere, a good urban legend could exist in a space in which it may have sounded bogus, but still left room for some faith that it might have actually happened.

 

Read more...
 
ROBERTO GIL DE MONTES

 

Roberto Gil de Montes, “Yo Cora”

 

 

April 5 - May 10, 2014 at Lora Schlesinger Gallery, Santa Monica

by A. Morert

 

 

The title of Roberto Gil De Monte’s current exhibition, "Hecho en México" translates to Made in Mexico. This indicates the influence and permanence that a culture inscribes upon its inhabitants even long after they have left. Born and raised in Guadalajara, Gil de Montes moved to Los Angeles in 1965 but his developing practice as a sculptor, photographer and painter remained shaped by his early impressions of Orozco murals, the zeitgeist of Frida Kahlo and Diego Rivera, and the hypotonic symbolism of the Pre-Columbian era. The influence of large-scale murals is felt in viewing "Hecho en México," where an arsenal of symbols rendered in a flattened manner similar to hieroglyphics is repeated from one painting to the next, steadily unfolding a narrative of religion, ritual, history and the dichotomous nature of the self.

 

Read more...
 
SUSAN SIRONI

 

Susan Sironi, “Forget Me Not”

 

 

March 16 - April 20, 2014 at Offramp Gallery, Pasadena

by Betty Ann Brown

 

 

Susan Sironi limits her creative palette to two tools and one medium. Using scissors, scalpels, and books, she performs high artistic alchemy by transforming published material--bound volumes of image and text--into astonishing wall works and sculptures. She does this by cutting pages of books so that, properly installed, they become three-dimensional curiosities: shadow boxes filled with densely wound paper intestines, bouquets of tiny flowers bursting out of narrow frames, piles of paper "confetti" inviting viewer interaction. For the current exhibition, Sironi has ringed the walls of Offramp Gallery with a 48-foot-long Timeline that situates collaged material under fragments of text--specifically, notes the artist made to herself as she worked in the studio. The pictorial surfaces float below a sheath of Plexiglas on which silkscreened words are scattered like the syncopated notes of a Player Piano scroll.

 

Read more...
 
EUGENE DAUB and MURIEL OLGUIN

 

Eugene Daub, “Rosa Parks”

 

 

April 3 - May 29, 2014 at The Loft Galleries, San Pedro

by Shirle Gottlieb

 

 

If you've ever visited the San Pedro art district you know that many studios as well as some galleries are located south of Gaffey Street in the city's "old town." One of them, The Loft, is a converted warehouse which houses seven individual art studios; it also sponsors ongoing exhibitions that showcase the talents of local artists. "Old San Pedro Treasures" features the sculpture of Eugene Daub and paintings by Muriel Olguin. The title is certainly apt, since both artists are acclaimed stalwarts; not only of San Pedro but regionally. Daub's sculptures enjoy a national reputation. Daub has received commissions from the U.S. Government, many private foundations, and Universities around the country. Just last March, Daub's 27-inch bronze sculpture of Rosa Parks was unveiled in Washington, D.C., and presented in the Rotunda to President Obama, John Boehner, and Harry Reid.

 

Read more...
 
“HEAVEN AND EARTH: ART OF BYZANTIUM FROM GREEK COLLECTIONS”

 

Icon with the Raising of Lazarus

 

 

April 9 - August 25, 2014 at Getty Villa, West Side

by Scarlet Cheng

 

 

The Byzantine Empire lasted for over a millennium, from the 4th to the 15th centuries, when Constantinople (today’s Istanbul) fell to Ottoman invasion. During its time it had been the most formidable political force in Europe, and where there's power, there's powerful art to bolster and to reflect it. In art history, we learn that a high point in early Western art occurred under the patronage of Byzantine co-rulers Justinian and Theodora, who in the 6th cenutury established their capital in Ravenna, Italy. Greece was an integral part of this empire, and "Heaven and Earth: Art of Byzantium from Greek Collections" shows how much of Byzantine art and architecture is still there. This is a fascinating survey, beginning with the pagan and Roman era and taking us through to the Christian one. It features over 160 objects from 34 collections, including painting, illuminated manuscript, metalwork, jewelry, glass, embroidery, and ceramics — the largest and most important collection of Byzantine objects from Greece ever presented in Los Angeles.

 

Read more...
 
CONTINUED AND RECOMMENDED, APRIL 2014

 

Jacob Hashimoto, “Gas Giant” (detail), 2012, mixed media installation, dimensions variable, is currently on view at MOCA Pacific Design Center.

 

 

Jacob Hashimoto's installation "Gas Giant" turns MOCA's Pacific Design Center space into an enchanted kingdom full of handmade kites. Hanging from the ceiling are thousands of square and circular forms clustered in groups creating a three dimensional landscape. These "kites" are constructed from paper, some brightly colored, other decorated with patterns to represent grass, sky, sun and clouds. The kites dangle from the ceiling to different heights so as to create a labyrinthal path for visitors to walk through. Hashimoto's labor intensive installation fills both the upstairs and downstairs spaces. While it is densely packed it is a contemplative environment that invites you to stop, sit and take in its beauty (MOCA Pacific Design Center Gallery, West Hollywood).

Jody Zellen

 

Read more...
 
MARCH, 2014

 

 

 

Our current Previews feature our editors' and contributing writers' evaluations of exhibition that open or continue into the current month, so as to provide you with the opportunity to view those that are of interest to you.

 

To look up past articles you can go to our archive of Articles forward from April, 2010; or the ArtScene Articles Archive prior to April, 2010 will be called up from a database separate from those starting April, 2010, so you will experience differences in appearance and navigation.

 

Here are our Previews and Recommendations for March, 2014.

 
MIKE KELLEY

 

Mike Kelley, "More Love Hours Than Can Ever Be Repaid and The Wages Of Sin"

 

 

March 31 - July 28, 2014 at The Museum of Contemporary Art [MOCA], Downtown

by Jody Zellen

 

 

It is hard to imagine, had Mike Kelley not passed away in 2012 at the age of 57, what new works would have been inserted into his vast retrospective. The exhibition, organized by Ann Goldstein (former Director of the Stedelijk Museum in Amsterdam) in cooperation with the Mike Kelley Foundation for the Arts, was first presented at the Stedelijk Museum, then traveled to MoMA PS1, New York and the Centre Pompidou, Paris, before completing its tour at the Geffen Contemporary in Los Angeles. This exhibition spans Kelley's career and includes both early and late works in all media, including photographs, sculptures, drawings as well as videos and multi-media installations in which he collaborated with other artists like Paul McCarthy and Jim Shaw. There was almost nothing Kelley was afraid to try and subject himself or his viewer's to.

 

Read more...
 
UDO NOGER and CARLSON HATTON

 

Carlson Hatton, "Markers in Time"

 

 

March 8 - April 19, 2014 at Ruth Bachofner Gallery, Santa Monica

by Andy Brumer

 

 

German born artist Udo Noger uses the elemental theme of light as his inspiration, source and both literal and metaphorical subject matter in his sophisticated painting/constructions. Titled "Water Has No Figuration," the stretched satin fabric surfaces are treated with mineral oil and mounted on medium to large sized three-inch thick box-like structures. These translucent armatures allow filtered light to fill the volumes and flow through them. The satin both holds and mutes Noger’s faint and fuzzy images of abstract and minimal shapes, suggestive of ethereal geologic structures or labyrinthine configurations of bones or smoke painted in rugged strokes of faint grays, light blue and soft white hues.

 

Read more...
 
<< Start < Prev 1 2 3 Next > End >>

Page 1 of 3
Articles Archive | Older Articles prior to March 2010