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"DRAWINGS: THE HAND OF THE ARTIST"



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

RUTH ASAWA, LORSER FEITELSON, LEE MULLICAN
DRAWINGS: The Hand of the Artist
April 29 through June 24, 2006
Opening Reception: Saturday, April 29, 2 to 5pm




TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY
7321 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 933-5523, fax (323) 933-7618
E-mail, <tobeymoss@earthlink.net>
Web site, <http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com>
Hours, Tuesday - Saturday, 11am-5pm

Drawing, as a medium, is a broad term. Artists have used drawings for many purposes.  Originally, a drawing was seen as a preparation for a painting, sculpture or even a print. More recently, drawings have been seen not only as a means to an end but as the end itself.  Artists are “drawn” to this medium because of its immediacy, there is a freshness as a “prima idea”.  This exhibition at the Tobey C. Moss Gallery features works that were created both as preparatory studies and also as independent works of art.

In the former category, we have CLINTON ADAMSStudy for “Second Hand Store” from 1953, a finely rendered preparation for a lithograph of the same name created at the Lynton Kistler Studios in Los Angeles. MILLARD SHEETSFive Horses is a preparatory study for a lithograph that was also created at Kistler’s studio. We will also be showing an ink and wash drawing by CUNDO BERMUDEZ, Musician Playing the Tumba, which was a study for one of the many murals that he created in Cuba. We include also JULES ENGEL’s rare 1939 pencil studies for Walt Disney’s Fantasia, as well as a figural study for LORSER FEITELSON’s monumental painting, Love: Eternal Recurrence.

RUTH ASAWA created rich, organic forms through her techinque of sumi ink drawing in her Plane Tree series of the 1950s and 1960s.  LEONARD EDMONDSON also used innovative techniques in his Curiouser and Curiouser, where he created texture by incising into the paper with a hole-punch, among other things. Color is introduced in LEE MULLICAN’s vibrant Bacchus in the Garden of 1960. Whimsical sketches reveal PETER SHIRE’s projections of his famous tea kettles.



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