PALMER SCHOPPE

"Memorial Retrospective Exhibition"



FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

PALMER SCHOPPE (1912 - 2001), MEMORIAL RETROSPECTIVE EXHIBITION
MAY 4th through MAY 18th 2001
A Memorial Celebration of the life of PALMER SCHOPPE is scheduled for May 6th, 2001 from 3 to 5 p.m.

TOBEY C. MOSS GALLERY
7321 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles, CA 90036
(323) 933-5523, fax (323) 933-7618
E-mail, tobeymoss@earthlink.net
Web site, http://www.tobeycmossgallery.com

PALMER SCHOPPE, artist and teacher, died March 11th, 2001 at the age of 89.

After an early predilection for making art, PALMER SCHOPPE graduated in Santa Monica in 1930 and enrolled at Yale University. By the following year, he had moved to New York City and enrolled at the Art Students League. All his spare time was spent in art galleries, museums....and jazz clubs and speakeasies. Upon family demands in 1934 to return to Santa Monica, he directed himself through South Carolina to the Gullah community of the Low Country and through New Orleans. From these experiences he was inspired to create a body of work on the theme of ‘rhythms and blues’ through his paintings, drawings and an important suite of lithographs, the “Carolina Low Country Portfolio” in collaboration with printer Lynton R. Kistler in Los Angeles.

PALMER SCHOPPE’s teaching career included Walt Disney Studio, the Chouinard Art Institute and Art Center College of Design. He was also a tenured lecturer at UCLA from 1953 to 1976 in the Motion Picture Division, after having received Commendations during World War II as an animation director with Frank Capra’s unit in the U.S. Signal Corps.

PALMER SCHOPPE was also active as a muralist and sculptor, creating public artworks including sites for Del Mar and Hollywood Park racetracks, the Queen Mary in Long Beach, the Playboy Club, Atlantic City, and numerous hotel venues in Las Vegas and New Orleans.

This retrospective exhibition spans the 1930's through the 1990's.

For any additional information, please call the gallery at (323) 933-5523.


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