FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Art and Illusion: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation
August 24 through October 24, 2004
Reception to Meet the Artists: Saturday, September 18, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.

Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art
Pepperdine University

24255 Pacific Coast Highway, Malibu, CA 90263
No admission fee
(310) 506-4851 General information
(310) 506-7257 Museum staff
E-mail, <michael.zakian@pepperdine.edu>
Web site, <http://www.pepperdine.edu/cfa>
Hours: Tuesday through Sunday, 11:00 A.M. to 5:00 P.M.; Closed Mondays


Masoud Yasami, Composition with a Red Sphere, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 66"

“Works of art are not mirrors, but they share with mirrors that elusive magic of transformation which is so hard to put into words.”
—E.H. Gombrich, Art and Illusion: A Study in the Psychology of Pictorial Representation

Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art at Pepperdine University will present Art and Illusion: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation from Tuesday, August 24, through Sunday, October 24, 2004.

The exhibition will be open from 11:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Tuesdays through Sundays. There is no admission charge.

On Saturday, September 18, from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m., there will be a reception to meet some of the artists. The public is invited to attend.

The rise of abstract art in the twentieth century did not eliminate illusion. In fact, artists continue to use various forms of realist and nonobjective art to explore painting’s role in representing the world. This exhibition draws upon Frederick Weisman’s personal interest in the fascinating question of how visual art reflects what we see around us. The works run the gamut from photorealism to graffiti art, and explore the relationship of how painting can address and compete with our ever-expanding visual world.

As a collector, Weisman was always interested in illusion, which he saw as a form of magical transformation. To him, this element of transformation was the source of all true creativity. Some of the paintings function as mirrors and offer meticulously detailed representations of recognizable objects. Other works are non-objective and do not imitate anything, but draw our attention to the complex function of vision.

Many of the paintings on view explore various modes of representation, from realism to abstraction. Charles Bell’s Marbles is a tour de force of photorealist illusion. This painstaking rendering of a group of glass marbles captures the subtle details of a photograph but is painted by hand. At six feet wide, the scale allows you to appreciate subtle nuances that would not be noticeable when looking at the actual objects.

Other representational images draw upon the tradition of illustration and even cartooning. Scott Brennan’s Man with Volcano depicts a businessman with briefcase walking in front of a looming volcano. This surreal image creates a mood of tension as one wonders if an eruption is imminent. Robert Yarber’s Long Drop contains two cartoon-like figures floating over a city at night. They resemble parade balloons that have taken on a life of their own.

Abstract art can also offer examples of illusion. Robert Schaberl’s Untitled (Turquoise) on first examination looks like a simple blue disk. Yet when viewed up close, the multiple layers of paint convey the illusion that this static image is rapidly spinning. This work, by a young artist, is one of the new acquisitions by the Weisman Art Foundation.

Sculpture can also flirt with illusion. Tony Tasset’s Big Eye is a large, five-foot-wide sphere. Meticulously painted to resemble a human eye, this work offers an eye that looks at you as you look at it.

As these fanciful works attest, contemporary art never ceases to amaze, perplex and delight. This selection of art focuses on the amazing potential of human creativity. Artists in the exhibition include Charles Bell, Troy Brauntuch, Scott Brennan, Roger Brown, Louisa Chase, Crash, Daze, Jedd Garet, Red Grooms, Rodney Ripps, Robert Schaberl, Richard Sigmund, Tony Tasset, Robert Yarber, Masoud Yasami, and many others.

This exhibition was curated by Billie Weisman, director of the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation. Works will be on view in the Gregg G. Juarez Gallery, Ron Wilson–Designer Gallery, and West Gallery, in the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art. Funding is provided by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation.

Works are on view at the Frederick R. Weisman Museum of Art in the Gregg G. Juarez Gallery, West Gallery, and Ron Wilson–Designer Gallery. Funding is provided by the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation.

KEY DATES
Exhibition: August 24 – October 24, 2004
Reception to Meet the Artists: Saturday, September 18, 6:00 to 8:00 p.m.
Family Art Day: Saturday, October 9, 10:00 a.m. to 1:00 p.m.



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