FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Henry Moore
Drawings and Prints
July 14 - August 27, 2007

Leslie Sacks Fine Art
11640 San Vicente Blvd. (Brentwood), Los Angeles, CA 90049
Validated on-site parking.
310.820-9448, Fax 310.2071757
E-mail, lee@lesliesacks.com
Web site, http://www.lesliesacks.com
Please visit the gallery’s website to view additional works
Hours, Monday – Saturday, 10am – 6pm


(l.) Henry Moore, “Seated Figure”, 1959, pencil, pastel and wash on paper, 11 5/8 x 9 3/8 inches.
(r.) Henry Moore, “Standing Figures”, 1949, lithograph, 14 /58 x 18 1/4” inches.

Throughout his long and prolific career, Henry Moore (1898-1986) was absorbed by drawing. Even in his later years, when his hands were affected by arthritis, Moore always ensured that sketch pads, charcoal and pencils we immediately at hand, so that he could pursue what he regarded as ‘this essential activity.'  The drawings in this exhibition include two works, from 1958 and 1972. Although Moore's preoccupation during this period was his sculpture, he nonetheless found time to experiment with different media, drawing with felt-tipped pens on tissue paper laid down on drawing paper, for example. He also drew on blotting papers, using random offset patches of watercolor as a starting point for his imagination, as can be seen in the upper left of "Seated Figure" (reproduced above).          
 
Moore's graphic output was phenomenal - both in terms of quantity and in the sheer power and energy of each work. The four volume catalogue of his prints, spanning more than half a century, from 1931 to 1984, is nearly a foot thick. His prints are, for the most part, quite draftsman-like rather than painterly, with little use of color, and therefore give testimony to the status he accorded drawing, which belies the stereotypic criticism of abstract art being disconnected from classical discipline. The prints in this exhibition are carefully selected examples, beginning with his seventh lithograph and continuing through works completed near the time of his death. Moore was certainly the most influential sculptor of the 20th century. He was a living legend, receiving official honors and academic recognition worldwide.
 
The text above is based upon passages from Henry Moore: Drawings, edited by Ann Garrould (Thames and Hudson, London 1988), and Henry Moore: Complete Drawings, vol. 4, 1950-1976, also edited by Ann Garrould (Henry Moore Foundation and Lund Humphries, London 2003).




Return to Gallery Pages