FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Kaucilya Brooke: Vitrinen in Arbeit
February 4th through April 2nd, 2005
Opening reception: Friday, February 4th, 7-9pm


Michael Dawson Gallery
535 North Larchmont Boulevard, Los Angeles, California 90004
(323) 469-2186, FAX (323) 469-9553
E-mail, <andrew@dawsonbooks.com>
Web site, <http://www.dawsonbooks.com>


Kaucilya Brooke

Michael Dawson Gallery is pleased to present a new exhibition of large-scale color photographs by Kaucyila Brooke, continuing her investigation of landscape and architecture as culturally determined social space.  Vitrinen in Arbeit (meaning museum display under construction) details Brooke's investigation of The Natural History Museum in Vienna, Austria as the museum displays are dramatically renovated to become more visitor-friendly and to conform to current educational standards.  Inaugurated in 1889, the palatial architecture of the museum and it's systematic arrangements of natural objects and furnishings have remained virtually unchanged.  It was not until the middle 1990's that electric light was added to the exhibition halls, which meant that during the winter months the museum would often close as early as 2 o'clock in the afternoon because it was no longer possible to see.

The resulting project includes several hundred color photographs tracing the "antiquarian" display of human and animal bones contrasted with smaller animals floating in jars filled with grayish green liquid, along with vast displays of rocks describing the passage of geologic time.  Photographs from the series selected for exhibition beautifully illuminate the fullness of the collection, the contrast of historic and contemporary wall decor and the hollow containment of empty display cases reflecting the transformed interior space of the museum building.

A limited edition book, designed by Kaucyila Brooke and published by Michael Dawson Gallery, is scheduled of completion during the run of the exhibition.  The book expands the narrative of the museum displays and illuminates the entire scope of Brooke's visual investigation of the museum's architecture.



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